11.24.2008

New Jack Rabid/Big Takeover Podcast



There are very few things to like about Mondays. For most of us, Monday means back to work, to responsibility, to sobriety. However, there is always one good reason to look forward to the beginning of the week, a new podcast from founder/editor of The Big Takeover, Jack Rabid, over at Breakthruradio.

Rabid has been a fixture in the world of underground music now for nearly three decades, through his bands; Even Worse, Last Burning Embers, and Springhouse, and through his tireless advocacy of "Music With Heart" via his twice-yearly magazine, The Big Takeover, and various other publications and media outlets. He has now had a weekly podcast since last Spring. It is well worth a listen if you haven't checked it out yet.

The podcast comes off exactly as a reader of his magazine might expect. There are no pretenses. The tracks that are featured are chosen for their merit, not their accolades or buzzworthiness. Rabid peppers his 60-70 minutes with his own insights about the songs and artists featured, and relevant backstory where appropriate. While he comes off as supremely confident and comfortable in this format (likely due to past radio experience), there is nothing of the over-rehearsed formality that often mars chattier podcasts (think NPR pretentiousness, or, of many of the podcasts that used to be offered through Stylusmagazine).

The show includes music of all varieties, including punk, postpunk, indie rock, indie pop, shoegaze, etc. Each week, one is just as likely to hear from a band that is burning up blogland (Fleet Foxes, Walkmen) as an obscuro punk B-side (Weirdos, Screamers) ,or, a cut from a recent band that you haven't read about/heard about anywhere else.

If I could make one criticism, I would say that he sometimes leans too heavily on the same artists/albums week after week. However, it could be argued that the repeated appearances of the same bands might serve to underscore the fact that nothing that Mr. Rabid does appears to be motivated by any aim but to share the music that he loves with as many people as possible. And, if the end result is new fans for underheard bands like The Coast, Anthem In, and Darker My Love, then this is a very minor gripe.

Above is a 1982 video from CBGB of Bad Brains doing the song that gave The Big Takeover it's name.

This week's playlist:
00:00 DJ Jack Rabid
00:18 Spring Unseen - Magnetic Morning
02:18 It Won't Stop - The Great Shakes
04:44 21st Century Ghost - The Unremarkables
08:48 The Brain - Frances
12:27 DJ Jack Rabid
14:33 Disclaimer - The Dears
21:14 Black Ghost/Black Girl - Starling Electric
23:35 I'm So Happy - The Interiors
26:04 They're Not Witches - Guided By Voices
26:52 DJ Jack Rabid
28:33 Human Bomb - D.O.A.
32:02 Oh Canaduh! - Subhumans Canada
34:18 Have a Nice Day - Kinetic Stereokids
38:26 Snowed In/Cruisin' - Joel Plaskett Emergency
44:50 DJ Jack Rabid
48:08 What Happened to Manfred, What Happened to Jane? - Edward Rogers


Listen to the Big Takeover Podcast here.
Subscribe to The Big Takeover magazine here.
Purchase CDs from all of Mr. Rabid's bands through his Pink Frost Records.
Learn more about Mr. Rabid and his magazine here.
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1 comment:

  1. Pretty interesting material here. Every post has been a very good read. I think if you felt like Kanyes new album wasn't worth listening to, why would you write so in-depth about it? I feel like it would be more beneficial to just write about the good things going on in Hip-Hop and not focus so much on that no talent ass clown. Sounds like he sat in a studio with the radio on and just remixed a weeks worth of radio. I wouldnt have even given him the credit of being some-what of a good producer, the only thing he's good at is flipping old tracks for the audience that wasn't old enough or isn't experienced enough in the music scene to remember and/or know about in the first place.

    To me it feels as if Kanye is the new dog spinning the old shit. I have never felt he was even beginning to be remotely clever in his lyrics, to me it feels like he's the used car salesman of hip-hop today. saying and doing anything he can to make a buck off an audience of people who don't know any better.

    -Cory

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